May

23

Was Marsden Hartley Really a Great Painter?

Walker analyzes not just how Hartley’s movement and travel around the world influenced his style, but also how the art world changed its perceptions of Marsden Hartley as an innovator, imitator, experimentalist, or influencer. Perhaps Hartley’s life and changing artistic legacy tell us more about history-making and public memory than they do about his work.

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May

19

Can Art Make a Difference at the US-Mexico Border?

As Ushiro describes the US-Mexico border, “This area is a very crazy area…This is the most important area to think about freedom—and it’s completely not freedom.” Chim↑Pom’s installations challenge viewers to look at this liminal space and reconsider the US-Mexico border.

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Apr

29

Remembering the LA Uprisings through Theater

One of the first artists to address the L.A. uprisings was the actor/playwright Anna Deveare Smith. In the summer of 1993, just one year after the Rodney King verdict, Smith opened her one-woman show “Twilight: Los Angeles, 1992,” at the Mark Taper Forum. Theatre Journal published seven reviews of “Twilight” in order to attempt to chronicle the diversity of reactions to Smith’s pioneering monologues.

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Apr

09

How to Talk about Diego Rivera and Mexican Art

Werner dissects the complex relationship that existed between Diego Rivera and Mexico itself, writing, “Not before setting foot in Mexico last summer did I feel that I had arrived at a real understanding of Diego Rivera’s work.” In this description, the reader can come to understand Werner’s experience of Mexico — that it exists as a palpable character and live influence upon Rivera’s work.

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Mar

16

Migrant Rights in the Age of Surveillance

Charles Heller and Lorenzo Pezzani use digital technology, geo-spatial mapping, and human testimonials to visualize human rights violations and to fight for migrant rights.

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Feb

23

Retelling the American West in the Museum

In this time filled with “alternative truths,” historian Marsha Weisiger argues for more sophisticated and multifaceted approaches to telling the history of the American West.

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Feb

20

Unpacking the Racially-Charged Term “Superpredators”

In the ‘90s, racialized terms like “wilding” and “superpredators” conjured dangerous racist imagery, causing moral panic, which both justified and resulted in the Crime Bill and other similar propositions.

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Jan

29

Jimmie Durham and the Art of Interruption

During a time when American history lessons are needed more than ever, Jimmie Durham’s return to the U.S. is appropriate and a welcome interruption to the norm.

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Jan

27

The Enduring Humor of New Yorker Cartoons

Now readers can go back in time (or at least throughout the 90 years represented in the New Yorker archives) to see the cartoons that continue to spur laughter and those that reflect larger changing societal values. The publication and its artists endure and keep the much-needed humor coming.

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Dec

25

How Charles Dickens Set the American Christmas Dinner Table

At the heart of Christmas celebrations are nods to tradition along with acceptance of change, just as Dickens once inspired.

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