Feb

23

An Interview with Sam Durant

Given the current political climate in the U.S. and abroad, as well as this age of post-truths and alternative facts, Durant’s work is both appropriate and necessary. The Hammer Museum even recently put his famous piece, End White Supremacy, back on view because of its timely nature. I caught up with Durant to discuss his process, motivations, and upcoming plans.

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Feb

20

Unpacking the Racially-Charged Term “Superpredators”

In the ‘90s, racialized terms like “wilding” and “superpredators” conjured dangerous racist imagery, causing moral panic, which both justified and resulted in the Crime Bill and other similar propositions.

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May

05

On Celebrating Cinco de Mayo

Thinking of celebrating Cinco de Mayo at your school this year? Learn from history about some of the potentially insensitive pitfalls…

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Jul

29

“Between the World and Me”: Ta-Nehisi Coates and the Legacy of James Baldwin

In language, form, and subject, Coates picks up this dream where Baldwin left off. Throughout his book, he refers to the “Dreamers,” comprised of “people who think they are white” who are fully and blindly invested in both the mythology and rich inheritance of the American dream, without any understanding or acknowledgement of the violence upon which our country, and their privilege, was founded.

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Jul

16

Responding to Terror: The Art of Kerry James Marshall

Artist Kerry James Marshall revisits lynching photography from the 1930s, an all-too-familiar American form of terror. These photos which were often turned into postcards that were circulated in order to spread fear and terror even farther afield, he addresses this darker and extremely relevant history with his 2002 triptych Heirlooms and Accessories.

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Oct

02

Playing “Indian”: Manifest Destiny, Whiteness, and the Depiction of Native Americans

Comparing current (self) portraits by Native artists such as James Luna, Erica Lord, and Tom Jones to portraits by artists like George Catlin, Jon Mix Stanley, and Edward Curtis helps to highlight and disrupt a longstanding history and tradition of America’s investment in “othering” Native Americans. This lesson also looks at the practice of “playing Indian,” via films and mascots, all under the guise of “respect.”

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